2014 Count of Personal Items

It is that time of year again my friends. Here is the count: 93 personal items.

Miscellaneous items: #20

Miscellaneous stuff

Miscellaneous stuff

If you peer with your magnifier at this photo, you will see from back to front, left to right: Laundry basket, shredder, suitcase, backpack (behind coffee pot), towel with hair dryer laying on top, briefcase, coffee pot, to-go mug, iron, laptop, three pair glasses (bi-focal sunglasses, distance glasses and readers) and two glasses cases, watch. Missing from the photo are the car, ironing board (it is the same one for the past 5 years) and cell phone (as it is taking this photo.)

Bed includes 2 pillows, sheets and comforter

Bed includes 2 pillows, sheets and comforter

Clothing: #60

there are four sets, here are three of them

there are four sets, here are three of them


winter coat and rain coat

winter coat and rain coat


three work outfits

three work outfits

one work outfit, one days-off outfit

one work outfit, one days-off outfit


another days-off outfit. You have seen this one before

another days-off outfit. You have seen this one before


two days-off outfits

two days-off outfits


fourth days-off outfit

fourth days-off outfit

Black dress (and sweater for winter)--counts as one outfit

Black dress (and sweater for winter)–counts as one outfit


winter fleece and long-sleeved T-shirt and vest (3 items)

winter fleece and long-sleeved T-shirt and vest (3 items)


Footwear

Footwear


paint clothes, sweatshirt, swimsuit

paint clothes, sweatshirt, swimsuit


2 pair gloves, ear warmer headband, 2 pair earrings, bracelet, basket with 6 pair socks, 4 bras, 6 panties, pantyhose

2 pair gloves, ear warmer headband, 2 pair earrings, bracelet, basket with 6 pair socks, 4 bras, 6 panties, pantyhose


Personal Care: #13
basket, conditioner, soap, floss/toothbrush/toothpaste, nail clippers, grooming scissors, mascara, bottle of oil, foundation retainer, razor. Not pictured: lip balm

basket, conditioner, soap, floss/toothbrush/toothpaste, nail clippers, grooming scissors, mascara, bottle of oil, foundation retainer, razor. Not pictured: lip balm

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15 responses to “2014 Count of Personal Items

  1. Wow, that is simply amazing! I live in central Canada where the winter temperature drops to -25 to -35 in January to mid-March and as high as +30 to +35 (with humidity) in the summer so I need a larger wardrobe. A winter coat will do for December and parts of March but then I need an even warmer one for the deep freeze (Jan & Feb). We have four distinct seasons so there’s a raincoat for spring and a fall coat for, well, the fall. We wear wool and polyester in the winter and cotton, linen and polyester ( know it’s awful but it doesn’t crease and washes well) spring/summer/fall. Then there’s the boots (lined for deep freeze, unlined for winter, rain boots). But it’s your toiletries that really have me rethinking “Do I really need everything I have or am I keeping a stock of some things JUST IN CASE?”. Lovely post Fawn. Thank you for reminding us that we really don’t need so much stuff. As I left my mother’s suite (both my parents are in a retirement home) yesterday after spending a Father’s Day weekend with my parents, I looked back before closing the door and realized that she doesn’t have as much as she used to but her suite is nicely furnished, elegant and there’s breathing room (whereas their house then eventual condo had tons of stuff). I think of all the money my parents spent on furniture since they were married; money that could have been spent on travel or other experiences. At least now I’ve realized that once in your Golden Years, you’ll be selling off a lot of stuff so why bother accumulating it in the first place!

    • Our temperature here ranges from -10 F (or -23.5 C) to 105 F (or 38 C.) Though we had wind chill temps around -45 F (-43 C) for several days this past winter.

      I spend a lot of time with people at the end of their lives, and often all the stuff has become a burden to them, and then their kids.

      • I know what you mean about a burden on their kids. It wasn’t so bad when my married moved from a three-bedroom house to a two-bedroom condo because my brother, wife and niece came to help unpack. But when they moved from the condo to a retirement home, geez, I spent every evening for a week showing the place to potential buyers, the cleaned out all kitchen and dining room cupboards and put everything they weren’t bringing with them on their dining table (and beneath) then moved it to my condo (same building but two seven trips and up three stairs). The organized an auctioneer to sell the rest and then unpacked alone at the retirement home. I did this every evening and every weekend for one solid month. The following month, I ended up in the hospital twice and at home for a week resting (and wrestling) with a horrible migraine! I’m downsizing all the time so as to make life easier for my executrix and my niece!

  2. I meant “my parents” and not “my married”. Freudian slip??

  3. Your sport pants on your bed made me laugh a lot Fawn! They look all excited and geared up for the next run. They really made my day! And they even made me want to take up running again!

  4. Thank you for the post. My favourite topic! But what I see? Less than a hundred but more than the last year. Why so? )))

    • You are very astute. There are more clothes, which is partly because I’m hanging onto things longer than usual. I am anticipating this first year that I am paying for two colleges. There are more eyeglasses, which likely won’t be remedied for another 14 months or so. I got rid of the purse, but bought a hair-dryer. Interestingly, this number of items feels “too much” to me, and I have begun the winnowing process.

  5. Have you ever considered writing a book on your experience with minimilism and downsizing? It could contain photos of each room so we get an idea of how much furniture is enough, along with photos of all the clothes in your wardrobe (as you’ve done above), linen closet, bathroom drawers, kitchen cabinets, etc., and possibily throw in some recipes. I don’t remember how I found your website (it could have been a link from a blog where they mentioned yours) but it didn’t show up when I searched for “minimalism” or “living frugally”. I’m sure many people would find it very interesting. Just a thought!

  6. I’ve thought about it, but I don’t really have the time to put into that kind of project right now. It would be fun, and I do want to get the word out…..but I’m still busy with teenagers. 🙂

  7. Fawn, I am so impressed with the small number of items that you show to us that you have and still manage to live a full life with children, job, and a home! Your life is an inspiration to me. I love the way that each item is useful. In an older post you mentioned that you lost some weight and this is something I am interested in. Did your life as a minimalist help you achieve this goal? Maybe in a future post you could address this.

  8. I love it! I came actoss your blog some time ago and have it bookmarked. I enjoy your view on minimalism. Thank you for sharing your ideas about downsizing personal posessions. Its a work in progress for me.:)

  9. Thank you Fawn for the pictures and this great post. You are really inspiring. I am discovering that minimalism is indeed a process. It’s a mindset that takes time and practice to acquire. I have listened to Dave Bruno’s 100 things challenge speech a few times so that my mind has something to chew on and I am amazed that it is working. I am also amazed that when I think I’ve gotten rid of enough things, a few days later I find another thing or two to let go of. My mind is also less cluttered too.

  10. Diane, I know what you mean about parents’ who are aging and still have a house packed full of stuff. I am already talking to my mother about this. She is aware of what a burden it is to surviving family members having watched other people in our family go through this. But at the same time has always, as far as I can remember, had the shopping bug real bad. It’s better now, but there’s still too much stuff in there in my opinion. But I try not to be judgmental and encourage her whenever I hear that she got rid of more stuff. A couple of people my age still talk about getting the big house, boat, multiple cars, and fancy stuff. I used to think that way too but now it exhausts me to think about taking care of, worrying about, and keeping up with all that. I like what I have right now and at times wish it were less. Thanks for letting me ramble about my thoughts. I hope it helps others a little.

    • Romana, our parents grew up in a time where people were judged by the size and quantity of what they owned, including which neighbourhood they lived in. I was able to downsize them a bit when they moved from house to condo but since they entertained a lot, they kept most of their kitchen stuff. It’s good that you’re not being judgmental because that could offend them and put them off downsizing. Keep up the great work at encouraging them and I hope you don’t have as many things as I had when they moved to a retirement residence!

  11. Pingback: MIP: Part 1 – Purse | Cut the Frills!

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